Cooperatives: the Business Model of the Future

Whether you consider the cooperative model to be market socialism or an alternative, both are opportunities to position it in opposition to pure capitalism. Cooperatives are one strategy to transition from a society that focuses on capitalist profit to one that focuses on human needs.
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Eating in Montana: Healthful Food or Junk Food?

Farmers markets and CSAs sprout up every spring along with the lettuce and tomato plants. Supermarkets across the country, from small family-owned stores to big box chains, are all offering organic options throughout the store, not just produce any more. So, we all think – or would like to think – that we’re eating nutritious food. Do we even know what good “nutrition” is?
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Not again?!? Yes, we gave in to the temptation of early California strawberries!

Every year or so, when the first California berries make their appearance, we’re seduced into buying one – just one – box of strawberries at the supermarket. They always look so beautiful: large berries, bright red, the leaves still attached and fresh…
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Stand Together or Starve Alone by Mark Winne

Stand Together or Starve Alone: Unity and Chaos in the U.S. Food Movement, Mark Winne (Praeger, 2017)

“The Food Movement” is a pretty big concept – it can incorporate anything and everything from farming and food production to distribution, marketing, and retail sales. Then toss in farmers markets, food co-ops, and CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture)
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Farm to Table: The Essential Guide to Sustainable Food Systems for Students, Professionals, and Consumers, by Darryl Benjamin and Lyndon Virkler

The book is comprised of two main sections: Farm and Table, where the “Farm” segment focuses on the environment, industrial ag, monocropping, CAFOs, and the future of farming, and the “Table” segment addresses restaurants, local purchasing, green restaurant practices, school and institutional food service, and marketing the concept of Farm-to-Table.
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Out in the Fields – Blending Farming and Ranching in the Drylands of the Northern Great Plains

On a beautiful early summer day, more than 100 people gathered at Jody and Crystal Manuel’s Prairie Grass Ranch for a Montana Organic Association Farm Day to learn more about dryland cropping, cover-crop grazing, soil health, and control of the organic farmer’s nemesis: bindweed.
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How Did Our Daily Bread Go Wrong?

Bread went from being a major part of our ancestors’ food intake to being a very small part of the food we eat today. Heavy, rich, and nutritious bread was once a daily staple; today commercial “industrialized” bread is produced in fully automated factories and is full of chemical additives and preservatives, too much salt, and has too little nutritive value. What went wrong?
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Growing Local: Grain, Flour, Bread

Most of the millions living in the Pacific Northwest forget that the drylands of eastern Washington and Oregon on the west of the Rocky Mountains and Montana to the east are also part of the nation’s “bread basket.” They’ve been raised to think that wheat comes from Kansas. The truth is that eastern Washington and Oregon, and central and eastern Montana produce millions of bushels of wheat, most of which is sold by the train carload to one of just a handful of huge commercial flour mills or is exported.
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Where's your beef ... from?

We all imagine that the beef we eat came from a cow living a happy-go-lucky life, frolicking on lush green pastures until a gentle and painless end. Obviously the average American does NOT want to meet their dinner while he/she is still standing. However, the idea that you could, if you wanted, meet the farmer who raised your dinner, is not so far fetched.
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Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups, Andrew Fisher

In Big Hunger, Andrew Fisher takes a critical look at the business of hunger and offers a new vision for the anti-hunger movement.
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