Stalking the Wild Yeast with Jack Jenkins (Audio)

Jack Jenkins, Country Living Grain Mills

We’re speaking with Jack Jenkins, Country Living Grain Mills, who manufacturers and markets grain mills that are hand-powered, bike-powered, horse-powered, wind-powered, water-powered, and even machine-powered! And he sells them around the world.

Get the instructions on making your own levain here.

To learn more about Country Living Grain Mills – made here in Washington – visit CountryLivingGrainMills.com.

Jack tells us how to tame wild yeast so we can use it to make bread. Listen to how he does it:

Jack Jenkins – Country Living Grain Mills

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2 comments to Stalking the Wild Yeast with Jack Jenkins (Audio)

  • Marianne Byrd

    Hi. It is my understanding that even among those who have tamed the wild yeast there is not much good to talk about ??

    I am 73, disabled, have had the Retsel mill which I loved, but it became much too expensive for me to have fixed or replaced. I purchased a new plastic mill – but no stones – no soft powdered flour when I need it…all those concerned about the temp. of flour I wonder how they feel about it’s temp when it is being baked ??? What’s the big deal. Right now I’m sitting here. Not making bread cause I just don’t care about the quality of flour out of my plastic, electric mill. Soooo wa da ya think? Marianne

    • GoodFood World Staff

      Marianne,

      I don’t have a mill either – I’d love to but it’s beyond my budget too. But I can get whole grain flour at the market (we shop at a food co-op) that is ground right before it’s shipped to the store. That means we’re getting whole grain in our bread and it’s relatively fresh.

      Conventional flour – whether it’s whole grain or not – is not that fresh.

      Keep experimenting with artisan flours; yes, they are a little bit more expensive, but the end result is much better. You might check at one of your local farmers markets as well; we have several growers who sell their whole grain flour at a pretty reasonable price.

      Take care, eat well, be well!
      Gail Nickel-Kailing