Meet Your Meat

While imagining that the beef they will be eating came from a cow living a happy-go-lucky life, frolicking on lush green pastures until a gentle and painless end, the average American does NOT want to meet their dinner while it is still standing. However, the idea that you could if you wanted, or at least you could meet the farmer who raised your dinner, is not so far fetched.
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It's a Go: Small, Local Meat Plants Can Sell Across State Lines

Ohio this week became the first state to gain approval to sell meat from small, state-inspected slaughterhouses across state lines — a critical step toward rebuilding processing infrastructure for small-scale, regional meat and poultry producers.
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Organic, Natural Livestock Systems Are Sustainable

Our Good Food on a Budget correspondent, Kate Hilmer, recently finished reading Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer. “One thing is for certain, and this book made it painfully clear to me: meat matters,” says Kate. “To what extent does it matter? It’s a complex and personal question that each of us must decide for ourselves.” Anne Schwartz, a Washington farmer, responds to those like Kate who are trying to decide whether or not to eat meat.
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Grass-Fed vs. Feedlot Beef - What's the difference?

If asked, most people could not tell you where the meat on their plate came from. In fact, if they wanted to know, it would be darned difficult – if not impossible – to find out. On the other hand, while imagining that the beef cow they will be eating is frolicking on lush green pastures, the average American today does NOT want to meet their dinner while it is still standing.
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Melissa Lines: Farmer, Shepherdess, Educator, Marketer

Running a farm and raising fifty or more sheep, a handful of beef cattle, and two horses is not a job for the faint of heart. And Melissa Lines is NOT Little Bo Peep. It was a farm visit when she was 4 years old that convinced Melissa that she wanted to work with animals, but it took decades – and a corporate career – to bring her to the point where she could actually make it happen.
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A New (Old) Way to Raise Meat

Over the last 70 years, the beef industry has changed considerably, evolving into an intense, industrial enterprise designed to put as much weight on as many cattle as fast as possible and get the resulting meat to market as quickly as possible. In response to the damaging impact of feedlot production, more and more farmers and ranchers are choosing to return to – and improve upon – traditional methods of raising cattle on grass.
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Grass Farming on the Bluffs Above the Mississippi River: On the Road in Minnesota

Situated on a high bluff overlooking the Mississippi, the 50-acre Malinowski farm is a mix of oak woods and open pasture. Currently the cattle are rotated among 5 paddocks spread across 20 acres; in past years as many as 50 cattle a year were finished here, with cows and calves housed at a second farm nearby.
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Is our meat infectious?

Our food system is definitely bottoms up! Animal agriculture consumes 80% of all antibiotics used in the US and yet our meat is covered with infectious bacteria. Multiple studies across the US and Canada show that our meat is contaminated with a variety of infections bacteria, some of which is resistant to multiple antibiotic types.
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