Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread...

Bread was truly the “staff of life” for both the peasant and the nobleman for centuries. In the Middle Ages, for example, a majority of the population – mostly peasants – ate 2 to 3 pounds of bread a day. Today, even with government recommendations of 6 to 8 ounces of “grain equivalents” a day, most Americans are eating about half as much bread as they did just 40 years ago.
Read more: Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread…

Gardening is a subversive act! Plus you get tomatoes...

Have you noticed lately that all that beautiful produce on the grocery shelves seems to spoil and go bad the day after you get it home? Didn’t it used to last at least a few days longer? What to do?
Read more: Gardening is a Subversive Act! Plus You Get Tomatoes…

When a Friend Needs Help...

A quirk of the weather (thanks, Climate Weirdness!), and hungry migrating birds can clean out a crop in a matter of hours! Help a friend: Make a donation at Nash and Patty’s Go Fund Me Page.

Instead of this…

Nash’s has this…

Patty and Nash Huber, Nash’s Organic Produce, made it
Read more: When a Friend Needs Help…

Our Daily Bread: It Takes Farmers, Millers, and Bakers

Most of the US forgets – or is simply ignorant of the fact – that the Northern Great Plains are a major part of the nation’s “bread basket.” They’ve been raised to think that wheat comes from Kansas. Our goal at GoodFood World is to stimulate discussion by reporting on the critical issues affecting the production and use of organic wheat and other grains, especially the challenges to small-scale organic family farms, millers, and bakers.
Read more: Our Daily Bread: It Takes Farmers, Millers, and Bakers

Cooperatives: the Business Model of the Future

Whether you consider the cooperative model to be market socialism or an alternative, both are opportunities to position it in opposition to pure capitalism. Cooperatives are one strategy to transition from a society that focuses on capitalist profit to one that focuses on human needs.
Read more: Cooperatives: the Business Model of the Future

Growing Local: Grain, Flour, Bread

Most of the millions living in the Pacific Northwest forget that the drylands of eastern Washington and Oregon on the west of the Rocky Mountains and Montana to the east are also part of the nation’s “bread basket.” They’ve been raised to think that wheat comes from Kansas. The truth is that eastern Washington and Oregon, and central and eastern Montana produce millions of bushels of wheat, most of which is sold by the train carload to one of just a handful of huge commercial flour mills or is exported.
Read more: Growing Local: Grain, Flour, Bread

What's the world coming to? Amazon buys Whole Foods for $13.4B!

Waking up to a headline like “Amazon buys Whole Foods for $13.4B” is pretty good considering the alternatives. The news has been a whole lot darker lately! Some “off the top of the head” thoughts here.
Read more: What’s the world coming to? Amazon buys Whole Foods for $13.4B!

Why a Winter Farmers Market?

Support your local winter market! Yes, winter market! So often we think of farmers markets as a summer thing. After all, summer is the growing season. Here in Montana we’re not ready to give up on markets when the snow starts to fly. The Bozeman Winter Farmers Market runs from the end of September to the end of April, and you can get your “fresh local food fix” every two weeks through the season. While you’re not going to find tomatoes and cucumbers on offer, you will find a wonderful array of products from 30 plus vendors.
Read more: Why a Winter Farmers Market?