Who will feed the starving masses?

We took GoodFood World on the road this week and it gave us a chance to discuss the big news of the last week: the alternative food system’s response to an article that appeared in the New York Times, Genetically Engineered Food for All, by Nina V. Fedoroff. Another salvo across the bow of agro-ecology and the organic movement, the article is just part of a propaganda blitz that has been going on for years, paid for – of course – by Big Ag and Big Food.
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Let's All Plant a Garden!

It’s been a cool, late spring here in Puget Sound, which means there’s still time to plant a garden. In fact, we’ve just gotten the tomatoes we bought at the Seattle Tilth Edible Plant Sale in the ground! Buying starts and seeds from local growers and at local sales ensures that you get plants that are climate-appropriate. There are some plants that just don’t do well in our short summers!
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Devon Peña - Teacher, Farmer, Anthropologist

Devon Peña – teacher, farmer, anthropologist – talks about food sovereignty and producer ethics. He is part of a co-op of 52 farmers in the San Luis Valley of Colorado who raise grass-fed beef and heritage corn and beans.
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Legal Challenges to Big Ag, the USDA, and the FDA

Lawsuits are flying around the food world these days! Do lawsuits like these work? Sometimes!
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Court of Appeals Dismisses Monsanto’s Appeal of Biotech Beets Case

On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a summary order concluding a long-standing lawsuit over the impacts of genetically engineered (GE) “Roundup Ready” sugar beets. As a result, previous court rulings in favor of farmers and conservation advocates will remain, including the order requiring the
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Andrew Kimbrell's Crusade to Keep Food Safe

Andrew Kimbrell is one of five attorneys who form the Center for Food Safety. Kimbrell, a bioethicist and author, was named one of the 100 leading visionaries by Utne Reader and his work focuses on legal battles to keep our food safe.
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Carol Deppe’s New Seed Offerings

Are you a seed saver and/or food grower? A new, one-person seed company has just been announced and it offers some fascinating items. The company is called Fertile Valley Seeds and it is Carol Deppe’s way of offering her innovative seed breeding work to gardeners, especially those in the Northwest. Her crop breeding techniques are in the public domain, rather than owned by a profit-making corporation
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West Africa: Women in Agriculture

Fatou Batta, Co-Coordinator for West Africa from Groundswell International, spoke recently in Seattle about the causes of food insecurity in Africa, particularly in Burkina Faso; the role of rural women in agricultural production and food security; the challenges rural women face; and some of the solutions they have developed.
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New GMO Lawsuit - This Time Suing Monsanto

Lawyers are busy trying to deal with new challenges from manufacturers of genetically engineered seed crops. There are two in the works now: one against the USDA charging that they did not handle the approval of genetically modified alfalfa in a lawful manner. The second is is a preemptive move that challenges the right of Monsanto to charge farmers whose plants have become contaminated with Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds with intellectual piracy. The Cornucopia Institute is a plaintiff in both cases, and Mark Kastel speaks about these issues.
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San Francisco Public Library Lends Seeds AND Books

The San Francisco Public Library is launching a pilot program at the Potrero Branch where residents can “check out” seeds, borrow books, tap into databases, and find other information sources about urban gardening. The process is simple: residents choose from a list of vegetable seeds available in the Seed Library collection, borrow them, and plant their seeds. After they have harvested their crops, they save the seeds from the heartiest and healthiest of their harvest and return the seeds to the same branch.
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