It’s GMO War: The Monopoly vs. the People

Last Thursday evening I attended a GMO panel discussion at CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College called GMO’s and Eco-labels: Getting More of the Story. Four distinguished panelists shared their knowledge from the front lines in battle against both Monsanto and the FDA about consumer right to know.
Read more: It’s GMO War: The Monopoly vs. the People

Dorothy, pay no attention to that GMO behind the curtain.

Make no mistake about it… Monsanto would be VERY happy to have you, Dorothy, PAY NO ATTENTION TO THE GMOs BEHIND THE CURTAIN. And behind the curtain is where the truth and greatest dangers lie, because their span and depth are nearly omnipresent in our modern American standard diet.
Read more: Dorothy, pay no attention to that GMO behind the curtain.

2011: The Issues - A Lot of Head-Shaking Going On!

Another year passed; 2011 was a quite the year in the food world! Here are a handful of “hot button” topics that sent us to our keyboards with heads shaking. What ARE we doing to our food, our families, and our future?
Read more: 2011: The Issues – A Lot of Head-Shaking Going On!

Dr. Huber - expert in microbial ecology - discusses the effects of genetically modifying plants

Most of us have no idea how genetically modified organisms (GMOs) actually work. What is it that makes it possible to kill the weeds growing in a corn field without affecting the corn? What is it that makes it possible for corn to “grow its own” pesticide to kill root worms? How does this modification affect the micro-organisms in the soil? How can it affect the animals – including we humans – that eat these plants?
Read more: Dr. Huber – expert in microbial ecology – discusses the effects of genetically modifying plants

What do you know about GMOs?

October is National Non-GMO Month, so it’s a good time to ask yourself how much you really know about what exactly GMOs are, why they’re produced, and how prevalent they are?
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Fox in the Hen House?

Tom Philpott at Grist clarifies a proposed decision by the USDA to allow Monsanto to fund the EIS studies on its own products. Even small companies separate the check signing function from the payment authorization function to insure no one is pocketing company funds. Allowing the industry to produce its own environmental assessments is tantamount to handing over the checkbook to someone who can make payments without any oversight.
Read more: Fox in the Hen House?