A Dose of Gardening as the New Social Medicine

When Meaza Birhanu, 39, learned she was HIV positive seven years ago, she was already bed ridden surviving on food donations from the World Food Program. The death of her husband prompted her to get tested and she was convinced that her death was next. By mid-2010, Maeza took up her new vocation as an urban farmer, and her outlook changed dramatically. In May, the group—known as Kalehiwot—planted corn. The rains came, the crop grew, and bushels of corn were sold on the market.
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Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Urban Gardens for Health, Solidarity, and Sustainability

Three women from USAID Urban Gardens Program prove that urban agriculture can improve lives of people living with HIV through economic empowerment as well as social engagement.
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2011: The Issues - A Lot of Head-Shaking Going On!

Another year passed; 2011 was a quite the year in the food world! Here are a handful of “hot button” topics that sent us to our keyboards with heads shaking. What ARE we doing to our food, our families, and our future?
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Hidden Crimes: Food and Farm Worker Welfare

The “Good Food Movement” is a reaction to the global food system. Like much of our economy, food production is dominated by large corporations and industrial food processes, and consumers are looking for a sustainable food system. At the same time, the conventional food chain provides work for millions of people, in production, processing, distribution, and preparation. The future of good food cannot ignore these workers; they are most often people of color limited to low-wage service and production jobs, where at least 6 out of 10 farmworkers is undocumented.
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