Thoughts About How We Eat

We no longer know why we eat the way we eat — our eating habits have grown entirely eclectic. We’re as often as not focused on novelty, whimsy — a reflection of our personal identities, all clowns in a gigantic world trade circus. All our cultural connections to food are being lost — as are our natural connections to each other and the earth.
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Farmer Jane: Women Changing The Way We Eat by Temra Costa

Farmer Jane profiles twenty-six women in the sustainable food industry who are working toward a more holistic food system in America a system that ensures our health with wholesome natural foods, protects the earth and wildlife, treats farm workers fairly, and stimulates local economies.
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Food and Farming Video Marathon - Here's the List!

Ready to learn all about good food? Here are enough videos to keep you watching for more than one weekend! Pop some corn, put your feet up, and prepare to be moved, inspired, infuriated, and motivated!
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Can Big Food Be Local Food?

So can local be big? Before I answer that question, it might be a good idea to revisit what we mean by local. Some good food policy advocates (including me) are substituting the term “community-based” for “local” to signify that local food systems are based on relationships rooted in place.
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Strategies for Sustainable Agriculture - the Millennial Agrarian Pioneer

Waves of change have irregularly swept through the realms of food and farms over the decades. There is a new wave of change now, says Chuck Hassebrook, Executive Director of the Center for Rural Affairs, but if we want a better sustainable future, we are going to have to take responsibility for creating it.
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Challenges to Agrodiversity in Poptun, Guatemala

Hombres de maíz. Men of corn. More than just a description, it’s the basis of the Mayan belief system. Popol Vuh, the Mayan’s eight hundred year-old narrative of creation, teaches just that: humankind is created from corn.
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Bringing the Food Economy Home by Helena Norberg-Hodge

Bringing the Food Economy Home reveals how a shift towards the local would protect and rebuild agricultural diversity by giving farmers a larger share of the money spent on food, and providing consumers with healthier, fresher food at more affordable prices.
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