Terroir-ist's Manifesto and the Lexicon of Sustainability

In this piece we connect Gary Paul Nabhan’s Terroir-ists Manifesto and the Lexicon of Sustainability – both focused on knowing your connection to the earth and to your food.
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Jerry Pipitone, Pipitone Farm

Jerry Pipitone, Pipitone Farm, Rock Island WA, talks about his part in the local food economy. He dries tons of fruit, for his own farm and for other farmers. And with the odd weather we’ve been having the last couple of years, farming is a little tougher than usual.
Read more: Jerry Pipitone, Pipitone Farm

Lori Stahlbrand, Local Food Plus

Lori Stahlbrand, Founder and President of Local Food Plus, talks about the potential for institutional procurement of local and sustainable food. Local Food Plus is committed to creating local sustainable food systems that reduce reliance on fossil fuels, create meaningful jobs, and foster the preservation of farmland – and farmers.
Read more: Lori Stahlbrand, Local Food Plus

Natural Food Co-ops: Putting Local Sourcing Into Practice

Food co-ops are different and they fit more comfortably into small towns and unique neighborhoods. Because they reflect the values and principles of their owners and members they can differentiate themselves more easily. We offer you a look at six very different natural food co-ops. Each one has its own personality and each one is committed to buying products from local providers.
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Jubilee Biodynamic Farm: Close Community Connections

How does one farm feed nearly a 1000 people? No, it’s not the miracle of the loaves and fishes; it’s the miracle of good soil, organic cropping, rotational grazing, and a community of busy hands. Jubilee Biodynamic Farm, Carnation WA, supplies 400 families with fruit, vegetables, and meat through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program – all from just 40 intensively-farmed acres.
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Shoulder to Shoulder We Await Our Food

There is a hydrological term for the end and next beginning of the flooding season wrapped around Summer. It’s called the “Shoulder Season.” The end of the shoulder season is the last flood in the Spring and the beginning, the first in the Fall. We are still touching shoulders with this past year’s season in Western Washington after what many feel is one of the worst flooding seasons we’ve ever had. Yet, the resilience of the farmers should amaze us all.
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Water, Water, Everywhere But Not A Drop…?

Have you noticed how conflicting news reports about water have been lately? Everybody wants it, we all need it, but no one seems to agree either on the relative availability of water into the future or how to manage it. One thing for sure, our food security depends on it.
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Open Source Farming - An Idea For the Times?

Marcin Jakubowski is open-sourcing a set of blueprints for 50 farming tools that can be built cheaply from scratch. He calls it a “civilization starter kit,” instruction set for an entire self-sustaining village (starting cost: $10,000).
Read more: Open Source Farming – An Idea For the Times?

Food and Farming Video Marathon - Here's the List!

Ready to learn all about good food? Here are enough videos to keep you watching for more than one weekend! Pop some corn, put your feet up, and prepare to be moved, inspired, infuriated, and motivated!
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Can Big Food Be Local Food?

So can local be big? Before I answer that question, it might be a good idea to revisit what we mean by local. Some good food policy advocates (including me) are substituting the term “community-based” for “local” to signify that local food systems are based on relationships rooted in place.
Read more: Can Big Food Be Local Food?