Urban Farming in Detroit

Urban Roots is a documentary about farming within the city limits of Detroit, and as such, it’s a handy way to get an education on the subject in something like 90 minutes. Dedicated Detroiters are working tirelessly to fulfill their vision for locally-grown, sustainably farmed food in a city where people – as in much of the county – have found themselves cut off from real food and limited to the lifeless offerings of fast food chains and grocery stores stocked with processed food.
Read more: Urban Roots – Farming in Detroit

Food Systems Planning at the Local and Regional Level

Ever more Americans are becoming urban dwellers and access to good quality, reasonably priced food grown sustainably is more and more challenging. Food is grown using chemical-laden agricultural methods and travels longer distances to kitchen or table. We need to find ways to bring sustainable food production closer closer to home.
Read more: Food Systems Planning at the Local and Regional Level

Cascading Effects: A Seattle Urban Farmer and the 2011 Season

Christina Hahs is a sprite with a direct stare. Even at the age of 27 she is not one of the youngest farmers in the City of Seattle. In the egalitarian context of urban agriculture it would be wrong to describe her with any other superlative or enumerator but she is, on her own, guiding a group known as the Harvest Collective. It has not been an easy year, however.
Read more: Cascading Effects: A Seattle Urban Farmer and the 2011 Season

Chicago, Walmart, Growing Power, and Cabrini-Green – What does it mean?

People like Will Allen and Erika Allen, his daughter, have been able to convince Chicago’s politicians that for-profit businesses like urban farms can be an economic engine, not just for the farmers and their employees, but for the city in the form of tax revenues. A well-functioning urban land use policy will allow small farms and food related businesses to put people to work, to generate income, and to pay taxes.
Read more: Chicago, Walmart, Growing Power, and Cabrini-Green – What does it mean?

Free to Grow and Pick!

When you think of Bath, England, you mostly think of the ancient Roman Baths or stately Georgian architecture. That is, if you think of anything at all besides claw foot tubs and jokes about drinking the bathwater. You most certainly don’t think of a thriving food system and underground guerilla gardening.
Read more: Free to Grow and Pick!

Campus vegetable garden beckons passing snackers

A little white sign tucked in between the plants offers passersby this invitation: “Need a snack? Come over and have a bite. We’re showing space-saving ideas for vegetable patches and showing that veggies can be pretty and yummy. Go ahead and munch on a tomato as you wait for the bus!”
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Andrés Duany Explains Agriculture and Urbanism

Andrés Duany, architect and urban planner, breaks down the methods of incorporating agriculture into urban environment in a Pecha Kucha* format in this video from CNU 19 in Madison, WI. The visuals may be a bit rough, but the audio is good and the content is terrific!
Read more: Andrés Duany Explains Agriculture and Urbanism

New Urbanism Meets Alternative Agriculture

This will be the first of several columns and interviews resulting from a recent 4-day Congress for New Urbanism Conference, otherwise known as CNU 19, held this year in Madison, Wisconsin, home of dairy, bicycles, and wacky politics. How many other states have a quarter of their state senators up for recall or host tractor protest rallies around the state capitol, have 6 months of winter, and a burgeoning organic foods industry?
Read more: New Urbanism Meets Alternative Agriculture