Where's your beef ... from?

We all imagine that the beef we eat came from a cow living a happy-go-lucky life, frolicking on lush green pastures until a gentle and painless end. Obviously the average American does NOT want to meet their dinner while he/she is still standing. However, the idea that you could, if you wanted, meet the farmer who raised your dinner, is not so far fetched.
Read more: Where’s your beef … from?

It takes a community to raise healthy sheep!

Enclosed by surrounding mountain ranges, where black cattle and white sheep graze in sunshine filtered through a slight haze of wildfire smoke, a community comes together to concentrate on healthy animals, healthy soil, and healthy families.
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A Soil Crawl in Big Timber, Montana

When one of the world’s experts on soil health and land resilience (from Auckland, NZ, a 9,500 mile trek) is scheduled to lead a day-long workshop just 170 miles away, you do everything you can to be there!
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Farming in the 21st Century

A newly-released e-book explores a farm owned and managed by two engineers who combine traditional low-tech methods of animal husbandry with high-tech, solar-powered solutions. Download your free copy here.
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This Much and No More - Jubilee Biodynamic Farm: Small is Beautiful

Erick and Wendy Haakenson, and their son David and his wife Kristin, are farming in a floodplain skirted by the Snoqualmie River. An active farm nearly for 25 years, Jubilee Biodynamic Farm is home to one of the largest and oldest Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs in the state. Jubilee is an intensively managed, diversified farm comprised of 14 acres of fruits, vegetables, and grains and around 35 acres devoted to beef cattle, pigs, sheep, chickens, and ducks.
Read more: This Much and No More – Jubilee Biodynamic Farm: Small is Beautiful

Meet Your Meat

While imagining that the beef they will be eating came from a cow living a happy-go-lucky life, frolicking on lush green pastures until a gentle and painless end, the average American does NOT want to meet their dinner while it is still standing. However, the idea that you could if you wanted, or at least you could meet the farmer who raised your dinner, is not so far fetched.
Read more: Meet Your Meat

It's a Go: Small, Local Meat Plants Can Sell Across State Lines

Ohio this week became the first state to gain approval to sell meat from small, state-inspected slaughterhouses across state lines — a critical step toward rebuilding processing infrastructure for small-scale, regional meat and poultry producers.
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Organic, Natural Livestock Systems Are Sustainable

Our Good Food on a Budget correspondent, Kate Hilmer, recently finished reading Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer. “One thing is for certain, and this book made it painfully clear to me: meat matters,” says Kate. “To what extent does it matter? It’s a complex and personal question that each of us must decide for ourselves.” Anne Schwartz, a Washington farmer, responds to those like Kate who are trying to decide whether or not to eat meat.
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Grass-Fed vs. Feedlot Beef - What's the difference?

If asked, most people could not tell you where the meat on their plate came from. In fact, if they wanted to know, it would be darned difficult – if not impossible – to find out. On the other hand, while imagining that the beef cow they will be eating is frolicking on lush green pastures, the average American today does NOT want to meet their dinner while it is still standing.
Read more: Grass-Fed vs. Feedlot Beef – What’s the difference?

Melissa Lines: Farmer, Shepherdess, Educator, Marketer

Running a farm and raising fifty or more sheep, a handful of beef cattle, and two horses is not a job for the faint of heart. And Melissa Lines is NOT Little Bo Peep. It was a farm visit when she was 4 years old that convinced Melissa that she wanted to work with animals, but it took decades – and a corporate career – to bring her to the point where she could actually make it happen.
Read more: Melissa Lines: Farmer, Shepherdess, Educator, Marketer