Doing Business with a Handshake to Market Perfect Fish – Triad Fisheries

Even perfect fish don’t easily get from boat to table, there are stops along the supply chain. Mark Tupper, Triad Fisheries, does business the old-fashioned way: “I pay the fishermen as I sell the fish. Business is done with honor and with a handshake.” While no money is exchanged up front, Tupper is responsible to get the best price possible for the catch.
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Catching the Perfect Fish

Alive with shimmering color, a king salmon or lingcod is a beautiful fish as it comes out of the water. Keeping that freshness from the boat to the table is a skill that fishermen like Krist Martinsen and his sons, Olin and Karl, have learned.
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Fishing Vessel Constance, Sitka AK

Krist Martinsen and his sons, Olin and Karl, are troll fishermen on the Fishing Vessel Constance out of Sitka Alaska. Once you’ve seen the salmon or ling cod come off the F/V Constance, you’ll never look at seined or netted fish again.
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Clamming Up in Washington

Forget high tech, forget “Big Ag;” there are still hunter/gatherers at work on Washington’s Pacific coast. Pacific razor clams (Liliqua patula) grow wild on ocean beaches; they can’t be commercially grown in Puget Sound like oysters and other clams including geoducks. They are harvested with a bucket and a shovel, by hand.
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Taylor Shellfish Farms, Bow WA

Taylor Shellfish Farms, now managed by Bill and Paul Taylor, has a long family history of growing and harvesting shellfish, and leadership in regional water quality initiatives. In the 1880s, J.Y. Waldrip – the Taylor’s great-grandfather and an erstwhile rancher and gold miner – settled in Puget Sound to farm Olympic oysters. Today, a fifth generation is involved in the family operation.
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Pacific Northwest Shellfish – Clean Water and Good Food

While discriminating diners consider a platter full of oysters on the half shell a treat, most don’t realize those bivalves provided a necessary environmental service by filtering and cleaning the water in which they lived. Washington’s Puget Sound produces clams and oysters that are considered among the highest quality and safest seafood products in the world.
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