Mendoza’s Mexican Mercado Revisited

Mendoza's Mexican Market

In a city where conventional supermarkets and specialty markets like Whole Foods and PCC abound, what makes Mendoza’s Mercado so special? Mendoza’s secret ingredient is Sonia’s cooking – like “me abuela hizo” – “My grandmother made…”
Read more: Mendoza’s Mexican Mercado Revisited

The Business of Bread and Baking: Kneading Conference West

Whether it’s the urge to start a small bakery to sell a better loaf to the community or just a wish to make and eat a better loaf of bread than that available at the grocery store, the poor quality and poor nutritional state of our daily bread sends hundreds to gatherings like the Kneading Conference West to learn more.
Read more: The Business of Bread and Baking: Kneading Conference West

Stop the Leak Between Farmer and Consumer!

The Craftsman

Food and farm prices have been a major concern for politicians and pundits alike for more than a century, and the food supply chain has become ever more complex. How things change and how they remain the same!!
Read more: Stop the Leak Between Farmer and Consumer!

When a Grocery Store Closes, a Co-op Opens

When the grocery store in Elwood, Nebraska, closed in January 2012, Sharlette Schwenninger and LeahAnn Brell went into action. Today, the Elwood Hometown Cooperative Market has a bright future in a vibrant, engaged rural community.
Read more: When a Grocery Store Closes, a Co-op Opens

Local Sourcing Is On Good Footing at Stumbling Goat Bistro

Stumbling Goat Bistro

In a city where everyone seems to shop at one of the ten Seattle Farmers’ Markets, one of the 11 natural food co-op stores, or one of three Whole Foods Markets, a chef can be challenged to deliver on his or her claim of local sourcing. The good news: Stumbling Goat Bistro’s Joshua Theilen has farmers, ranchers, cheesemakers, fishermen, and millers beating a path to his door.
Read more: Local Sourcing Is On Good Footing at Stumbling Goat Bistro

FareStart Gives Seattle's Homeless a Fair Start

FareStart Restaurant - Interior

On the corner of Seventh Avenue and Virginia Street in Seattle is a restaurant. It’s a restaurant much like many other downtown restaurants: tall glass windows, comfortable seating, a view into a bustling kitchen and a creative – sometimes edgy – menu. But there is something that makes this restaurant different.
Read more: FareStart Gives Seattle’s Homeless a Fair Start

By Land or By Sea: Port Townsend Food Co-op

PortTownsendCoop_Thumb

Perched just 180 feet above sea level, Port Townsend WA (Jefferson County Seat) is a quaint Victorian town with a permanent population just over 9,000 people. It’s also the location of the 40-year old Port Townsend Food Co-op. The Food Co-op was officially launched in 1972 as a food-buying club; as were so many of the “second wave” of food co-ops during the 1970s.
Read more: By Land or By Sea: Port Townsend Food Co-op

Cooperatives - the business model of the future

598821_10151077760663282_1975455623_n

In recognition – and celebration – the NW Cooperative Development Center, the Alaska Cooperative Development Program, and Mission Mountain Food Enterprise and Cooperative Development Center, are partnering to present “Celebrating Our Food Community,” a conference to consider how cooperative business models will contribute to the future of our local and regional food systems. We spoke with Jan Tusick, Center Director for Mission Mountain Food Enterprise Center, about her organization’s part in establishing and supporting co-ops in western Montana.
Read more: Cooperatives – the business model of the future

Food Hubs: Back to the Future?

21AcresFoodHub_SEA_20120725_054

In an effort to bring back a connection between small local producers and their wholesale customers, particularly by urban and land use planners, the concept of a “food hub” has been introduced. Or some would say, “re-introduced.”
Read more: Food Hubs: Back to the Future?

The Problem of the Last Mile

Amazon Secure Lockers (Source: Wall Street Journal)

Until the day comes when we can teleport physical products from one point to another, we will have to depend on distribution networks that include trains, planes, and automobiles (or trucks). You can download an e-book or a movie, but you just can’t download a shirt or dozen eggs.
Read more: The Problem of the Last Mile