Building Local Solidarity Economies With a Global Reach

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New businesses launched by transborder migrants are not limited to farms and ranches and many small shops are also finding their place in the inner cities where they are revitalizing Main Street. They include specialty (ethnic) grocers and small market operators; restauranteurs, bakers, and caterers; tailors and cobblers; dry cleaners and other service providers; pharmacists and botanists; notary publics and accountants; the list is very long.
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The Business of Baking at SHIFT

If you see fudge sauce or marshmallows on the dessert menu, you can bet they’re made from-scratch. No food dyes, corn syrup or hydrogenated oils. Fruit is used when it’s in season and bulk ingredients are organic. No, the sugar’s not local and neither is the chocolate; these are fundamental building blocks of dessert as we know it. I can’t figure a way around that one, but considering everything else we do I’m comfortable with the compromise.
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If SMALL is Beautiful, Why Has BIG Taken Over the World?

Even as we face globalization (and standardization) of nearly every element of our lives, including the food we eat, there are between 25 and 27 million small and medium independent companies working separately to deliver us diversity and quality. It’s time we recognized the value that these businesses deliver to us, and to our communities.
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FAQs About GMOs

It can be tough to figure out why there’s so much fuss over genetically modified ingredients in food. This reprint from the upcoming March 2015 issue of Consumer Reports will help you sift through the facts.
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To Save Our Wild and Native Seafood, We Have to Eat It

If you live on the East Coast, West Coast, or Gulf Coast or even the Great Lakes, and if you’ve looked closely at the fish in your local supermarket – regardless of where you live – chances are you’ll find your fish originates from just about anywhere else in the world.
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Farming in the 21st Century

A newly-released e-book explores a farm owned and managed by two engineers who combine traditional low-tech methods of animal husbandry with high-tech, solar-powered solutions. Download your free copy here.
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T-40: Forty Years of Tilth

At this year’s Tilth Producers of Washington conference, now referred to as T-40, a few attendees of the first conference – older, wiser, and grayer – mingled with younger farmers (some not yet born when Berry spoke in 1974 at “T-1″) to share ideas, advice, and plans for the future.
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Protecting Wild Salmon Is the Right Thing to Do

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While Big Fish, Big Food, and Big Business would have you think that you can save nature by eating factory food, we have a better solution. Protect our wild salmon fisheries by eating more wild fish!
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Ebola Challenges the Success Achieved in Liberia’s Rice Sector

The Ebola outbreak – which has led to rising food prices and potential food shortages – reinforces the need for self-sufficiency and food security in times of crisis. Liberia has just begun to stabilize a network of rice growers and processors; rice grown in Liberia could go long way to support the Liberian population during this crisis.
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Cooking Is Not For Everybody, But Eating Is!

Jes Clay, proprietress of the (soon to be) Shift restaurant.

Make food simple, make the methods transparent. People will be amazed. They’ll try it at home. They’ll come back for more. Cooking is not for everybody. Eating, on the other hand, is and that’s good enough for us.
Read more: Cooking Is Not For Everybody, But Eating Is!