Revenge of the Lunch Lady and the Hospital Chef

To those unfamiliar with the absurdist theater of school lunch, it is puzzling, even maddening, that feeding kids nutritious food should be so hard. You buy good food. You cook it. You serve it to hungry kids.
Read more: Revenge of the Lunch Lady and the Hospital Chef

Time to Think Gardening; Time to Think Garden Tools!

It’s going on February (thank goodness!) and the seed catalogs are starting to arrive. So while you’re daydreaming about warm weather and your summer garden, it’s time to think about the tools you will be using. Good tools make for easier work and you owe it to yourself to have the best. Our recommendation is that you check out Lowell’s offerings.
Read more: Time to Think Gardens; Time to Think Garden Tools!

Gulch Distillers: Beyond Bread and Beer

What happens when two friends start dreaming about opening a distillery and making whisky in central Montana? Mix in shared childhood memories, inherited Helena red hair, and a love for single malt whisky, and you get Gulch Distillers. Gulch Distillers has a hometown feel and offers hometown products. Tyrrell HIbbard and Stephan Rasile use Montana-grown grains in their grain-based spirits, and use locally grown herbs, fruits, and other products when possible on both sides of the business – botanicals in the factory and fruit and berries at the tasting bar.
Read more: Gulch Distillers: Beyond Bread and Beer

The Cloud with a Silver Lining

In October 2016, two Tolima coffee lots ended up in the top five at a country-wide coffee cupping festival, including first place, surprising judges and the public. The victory and recognition comes at critical point for coffee producers in the southern part of the department. Though geo-climatic conditions favor the production of specialty brews with unique flavors, coffee producers face obstacles in processing, accessing financial mechanisms, and finding new markets.
Read more: The Cloud with a Silver Lining

“We the People” get to tell the government what to do!

The last week of October, heading into fall and Halloween, more than 200 people spent two days of intensive conversation outlining policy initiatives to be considered by the Montana State Legislature over the next decade to support, improve, and market Montana’s food products within the state and around the globe.
Read more: “We the People” get to tell the government what to do!

The Weight of Water

In Columbia’s strategically located region Montes de Maria, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc) roamed the countryside and destroyed entire irrigation systems, stole kilometers of pipelines, and stole or destroyed the pumps that fed the system from large water basins. Fear and destruction dissuaded many farmers from returning to their lands.
Read more: The Weight of Water

Dryland Farming - How They Do It In Montana

For those who are trying to farm in the Palouse region of eastern Washington, northern Idaho, and northwestern Montana, there is only one name for it – Dryland Farming.
Read more: Dryland Farming – How They Do It In Montana

The Sweetest Grapes Hang the Highest

The Phoenicians are credited with many things, but delivering the gift of wine to the shores of southern Europe is something for which mankind will always be thankful. Like the modern-day Lebanese, the fearless seafaring Phoenicians had an urge to meet distant horizons with zeal and brought grape growing and wine making in their wake.
Read more: The Sweetest Grapes Hang the Highest

Locally Laid: How We Built a Plucky, Industry-Changing Egg Farm – From Scratch by Lucie B. Amundsen

The story of Locally Laid, told with a lot of humor, a few tears, and much enthusiasm, celebrates the support they received from their community, their customers, and their friends and neighbors.
Read more: Locally Laid: How We Built a Plucky, Industry-Changing Egg Farm – From Scratch by Lucie B. Amundsen

When Did Our Daily Bread Take a Wrong Turn?

Bread went from being a major part of our ancestors’ food intake to being a very small part of the food we eat today. Heavy, rich, and nutritious bread was once a daily staple; today commercial “industrialized” bread is produced in fully automated factories and is full of chemical additives and preservatives, too much salt, and has too little nutritive value. What went wrong?
Read more: When Did Our Daily Bread Take a Wrong Turn?