Good Apple Karma

Take a drive north on Highway 97 and you will pass along the Columbia and Okanogan Rivers between tiers and tiers of orchards growing all kinds of fruit, from stone fruit – apricots, nectarines, and peaches – to apples, pears, and cherries, and the occasional quince. Just a few miles north of Tonasket WA you’ll find River Valley Organics. What’s is it that makes River Valley Organics so special? A unique combination of karma and heart.
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A is for Apple

Walk into any supermarket and what do you find? Bins of shiny red, yellow, and green apples. What seems like an abundance of apples is an illusion. Just 11 varieties of apples make up 90% of those grown, sold, and eaten in the US. What’s more, 40-plus percent of apples sold are only one variety: Red Delicious. The apple industry has succumbed to the same consolidation and specialization affecting the rest of the food industry. As a result, the number of apple varieties has plummeted.
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Crossing the Chasm with Viva Farms

Big agriculture is big business; too big, too distant, too reliant on the latest technology, and too focused on profit over good food. Expecting complex technology and genetic engineering to solve the problems of climate change, extreme weather patterns, water shortages, and dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, is not the answer. It is time to go back to the land, to restore our natural resource base and re-invest in our people.
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Down on the Farm

Your GoodFood World publishers are farmers one afternoon a week at Jubilee Biodynamic Farm in Carnation WA and it has rained every week since the end of April! A little mud never hurt anyone!
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Cascading Effects: A Seattle Urban Farmer and the 2011 Season

Christina Hahs is a sprite with a direct stare. Even at the age of 27 she is not one of the youngest farmers in the City of Seattle. In the egalitarian context of urban agriculture it would be wrong to describe her with any other superlative or enumerator but she is, on her own, guiding a group known as the Harvest Collective. It has not been an easy year, however.
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Stina Booth, Booth Canyon Orchard

Stina Booth, orchardist at Booth Canyon Orchard, talks about grafting and growing apples, pears and stone fruit (peaches, plums, apricots). Did you know you can graft multiple varieties of apples or pears on one trunk?
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Product Profile: Mazama Juice Cider

We took a “drive about” to apple country and met John and Beth Sinclair at their organic orchard in Twisp WA. They grow Honey Crisp apples on 8,000 trees in the Methow Valley of Washington. GoodFood World heartily recommends their sweet cider!
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Jerry Pipitone, Pipitone Farm

Jerry Pipitone, Pipitone Farm, Rock Island WA, talks about his part in the local food economy. He dries tons of fruit, for his own farm and for other farmers. And with the odd weather we’ve been having the last couple of years, farming is a little tougher than usual.
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Product Profile: Fresh Strawberries

Every spring we’re seduced into buying one – just one – box of strawberries at the market. They always look so beautiful: large berries, bright red, the leaves still attached and fresh… Open the plastic clam shell that displays those berries in all their voluptuousness; like Botticelli’s Venus on the seashell. Hold that little beauty in your palm – OK, stop salivating! Make that first slice right through the center…
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Jubilee Biodynamic Farm: Close Community Connections

How does one farm feed nearly a 1000 people? No, it’s not the miracle of the loaves and fishes; it’s the miracle of good soil, organic cropping, rotational grazing, and a community of busy hands. Jubilee Biodynamic Farm, Carnation WA, supplies 400 families with fruit, vegetables, and meat through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program – all from just 40 intensively-farmed acres.
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