Cooking Is Not For Everybody, But Eating Is!

Make food simple, make the methods transparent. People will be amazed. They’ll try it at home. They’ll come back for more. Cooking is not for everybody. Eating, on the other hand, is and that’s good enough for us.
Read more: Cooking Is Not For Everybody, But Eating Is!

Ma Petite Chou!

When life – or your CSA – hands you not one, not two, but THREE cabbages (OK, so we collected them over three weeks), it’s time to make cabbage soup. In the GoodFood World kitchen we turned an assortment of meats and vegetables into enough soup for an army – or at least a family of 8!
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It Takes Good Flour To Make Good Bread

It’s time to be honest; so I’ll lay it all out right here. I’m into my third year of my 5-year plan to learn how to bake good bread, and somewhere around March this year, I lost my baking mojo! Every loaf that came out of the oven fell into two categories: brick or curling stone!
Read more: Good Flour Makes Good Bread

Campanula: Edible Bellflowers

Campanula persicifolia

Gardeners have long cherished many species as ornamentals, for their lovely bell-shaped flowers. Nearly all species bear blue or white flowers; extremely few have yellow flowers. A few species have been grown as vegetables, and many others are eaten from the wild.
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Grow Your Own - Food, That Is

Across the country, spring can’t come soon enough and the call to garden is getting louder and louder. We had the opportunity to speak to Lisa Taylor, author of Your Farm in the City, and get a little advice for new and beginning gardeners. It’s never too early – or too late – to tuck a few seeds in some soil and get growing!
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Growing Your Own - Time to Get Gardening!

It’s the end of March, thank goodness! We won’t have winter much longer, though right now summer seems like years away… Even in the middle – or late winter – gardeners dream about their gardens as they pore over the dozens of plant and seed catalogs that have arrived in the mail. How else do we get through these last weeks of cold, slush, rain, and grey days?
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Tomato Dill Soup

This recipe is modified from a soup made by the Ovens of Brittany in a small cafe on a busy business thoroughfare in Madison WI. For nearly five years, I ate this soup at least once a week; it’s still my very favorite tomato soup.
Read more: Comfort Food: Tomato Dill Soup

Noodles: Like Mama Used to Make

Why would I make noodles when I can pop into my neighborhood grocery and get them for less than $2 a pound? And that question has a logical answer: Because if I make them, they are fresh, and I know exactly what goes into them.
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Wonder Bread or Wonderful Bread?

Chances are your family’s daily bread is just another item on your list when you shop at your favorite supermarket. Let’s take a closer look at what you’re bringing home; your bread may be “in disguise.” It’s pretty clear that fluffy loaves of mass-produced soft, damp, nutritionally deficient, chemical-laced bread made in large industrial “bread factories” and sold in tightly sealed plastic bags contain additives and preservatives to make them easy to process and to give them a long shelf life. But what about the rest of those loaves lined up just asking to be dropped into your shopping cart?
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Winter in Vermont - the WWOOFing Way

At this time of year in Vermont the animals are devoting what energy they have to staying warm. When the hens do lay eggs, they’re often frozen before we get to them. Some chickens have even developed frost-bite, so we stopped opening the doors for them in the mornings – they’re literally cooped up.
Read more: Winter in Vermont – the WWOOFing Way