It takes a community to raise healthy sheep!

Enclosed by surrounding mountain ranges, where black cattle and white sheep graze in sunshine filtered through a slight haze of wildfire smoke, a community comes together to concentrate on healthy animals, healthy soil, and healthy families.
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A Soil Crawl in Big Timber, Montana

When one of the world’s experts on soil health and land resilience (from Auckland, NZ, a 9,500 mile trek) is scheduled to lead a day-long workshop just 170 miles away, you do everything you can to be there!
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In Support of Small Boat Fishers and Small Business

At GoodFood World, we have been intimately involved with Northeast Pacific Salmon fishing for some time. We recognize Loki Fish Company, a small family business in Seattle, as the best example of sustainable fishing and direct marketing of fish in our region.
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An Arhuaco Solution to Man’s Disequilibrium

Osvaldo and I were talking about the ole bees, bouncing around in the back of a truck that was heading down a path, which would have been a nice stroll on foot. I told him about beekeepers in Ethiopia who still used traditional—euphemism for ancient—honey methods, meaning they climb trees and hang tubular, woven baskets,
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“We the People” get to tell the government what to do!

The last week of October, heading into fall and Halloween, more than 200 people spent two days of intensive conversation outlining policy initiatives to be considered by the Montana State Legislature over the next decade to support, improve, and market Montana’s food products within the state and around the globe.
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The Weight of Water

In Columbia’s strategically located region Montes de Maria, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc) roamed the countryside and destroyed entire irrigation systems, stole kilometers of pipelines, and stole or destroyed the pumps that fed the system from large water basins. Fear and destruction dissuaded many farmers from returning to their lands.
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Local Grains: Taking Back Our Wheat

Our “National Hymn,” America the Beautiful, opens with the image of endless skies over fields of ripe golden grain that reach to purple mountains on the horizon. Poet Katharine Lee Bates would probably be appalled to realize that she was eulogizing one of the worst examples of mono-cropping in existence – second only to the carpeting of Iowa with corn.
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Chia and Maya: Potential For a Nutritional Renewal In Guatemala

The conquistadores virtually erased chia from Mayan cultural awareness as part of their campaign to subjugate the Mesoamerican peoples to Church and King. But today, even as ordinary Guatemalans are engaged in a massive ongoing popular campaign to throw off the rule of a corrupt and brutal elite, chia may be ripe for rediscovery.
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Modern Hives Give Ethiopian Women Farmers New Vocation

Most of the Ethiopian farmers in the Lelistu Ogda farmer cooperative struggle with soil fertility. That’s why Ayelech Bekele and 19 other women now embrace beekeeping as an alternative method for increasing their incomes.
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Another One Bites the Dust: Wedge Co-op's Gardens of Egan Farm Auction

Gardens of Eagan, Northfield MN, 2010

As we face climate change and continuing issues of food security, how will natural food markets and co-ops source healthy local food and provide a living wage to farm and retail workers?

In 2007, the Wedge Co-op, Minneapolis MN, believed the simple answer was to buy the Gardens
Read more: Another One Bites the Dust: Wedge Co-op’s Gardens of Egan Farm Auction