Local Grains: Taking Back Our Wheat

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Our “National Hymn,” America the Beautiful, opens with the image of endless skies over fields of ripe golden grain that reach to purple mountains on the horizon. Poet Katharine Lee Bates would probably be appalled to realize that she was eulogizing one of the worst examples of mono-cropping in existence – second only to the carpeting of Iowa with corn.
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Chia and Maya: Potential For a Nutritional Renewal In Guatemala

The beautiful children of Chajul

The conquistadores virtually erased chia from Mayan cultural awareness as part of their campaign to subjugate the Mesoamerican peoples to Church and King. But today, even as ordinary Guatemalans are engaged in a massive ongoing popular campaign to throw off the rule of a corrupt and brutal elite, chia may be ripe for rediscovery.
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Modern Hives Give Ethiopian Women Farmers New Vocation

Most of the Ethiopian farmers in the Lelistu Ogda farmer cooperative struggle with soil fertility. That’s why Ayelech Bekele and 19 other women now embrace beekeeping as an alternative method for increasing their incomes.
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Another One Bites the Dust: Wedge Co-op's Gardens of Egan Farm Auction

Gardens of Eagan, Northfield MN, 2010

As we face climate change and continuing issues of food security, how will natural food markets and co-ops source healthy local food and provide a living wage to farm and retail workers?

In 2007, the Wedge Co-op, Minneapolis MN, believed the simple answer was to buy the Gardens
Read more: Another One Bites the Dust: Wedge Co-op’s Gardens of Egan Farm Auction

Red Meat, Processed Meat, and Cancer – The Latest Form of Yellow Journalism?

We’ve just finished 31 days of commercials, ads, and events – and pink everything – as part of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we’re all aware of the threat of cancer – all types of cancer – regardless of our age or gender. So now we’re being told that even the meat on our plates is going to cause cancer. What’s the real truth?
Read more: Red Meat, Processed Meat, and Cancer – The Latest Form of Yellow Journalism?

Africa's Top Chickpea Producer Brings First Industrial Processing Machine Online in 2015

Ethiopian food processor and exporter Agro Prom has made the first step in changing the course of Ethiopian chickpea history and established the country’s first industrial chickpea processing and cleaning machine.
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So Long, and Thanks For All the Fish

The ocean contains 97% of the planet’s water and covers 71% of the Earth’s surface. Stand on the shore and its expanse and distant horizon imply an endless source of resources. Now we recognize that the oceans are not boundless and the numbers of fish are not endless. It wasn’t until the late 20th Century that we understood the world production (harvest) of fish is on a downward trend and we will be out of fish by the middle of this century unless we take some drastic steps.
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If It Isn't Broken, Don't Try To Fix It!

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As they say (more or less): “inquiring consumers want to know…” GoodFood World recently received a comment from a reader that made it clear consumers are concerned – and confused – about genetically engineered foods being developed and brought to market.
Read more: If It Isn’t Broken, Don’t Try To Fix It!

Food, First Hand in Cameroon

The local market

Located in the “hinge” of sub-Saharan West Africa, Cameroon is home to about 19 million people. Because the country’s natural resources are suited to agriculture, an estimated 70% of the population farms. External forces of globalization are now putting pressure on African countries such as Cameroon to shift agricultural production from subsistence-scale local production to large-scale commercial production.
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Building Local Solidarity Economies With a Global Reach

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New businesses launched by transborder migrants are not limited to farms and ranches and many small shops are also finding their place in the inner cities where they are revitalizing Main Street. They include specialty (ethnic) grocers and small market operators; restauranteurs, bakers, and caterers; tailors and cobblers; dry cleaners and other service providers; pharmacists and botanists; notary publics and accountants; the list is very long.
Read more: Building Local Solidarity Economies With a Global Reach