The Post Carbon Reader by Rchard Heinberg and Daniel Lerch

How do population, water, energy, food, and climate issues impact one another? What can we do to address one problem without making the others worse? The Post Carbon Reader features essays by some of the world’s most provocative thinkers on the key issues shaping our new century, from renewable energy and urban agriculture to social justice and community resilience.
Read more: The Post Carbon Reader by Rchard Heinberg and Daniel Lerch

Holy Shit: Managing Manure To Save Mankind by Gene Logsdon

In his insightful new book, Holy Shit, Managing Manure To Save Mankind, contrary farmer Gene Logsdon provides the inside story of manure – our greatest, yet most misunderstood, natural resource. Gene Logsdon does not mince words. This fresh, fascinating, and entertaining look at an earthy, but absolutely crucial, subject, is a small gem and is destined to become a classic of our agricultural literature.
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Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal by Tristram Stuart

With shortages, volatile prices and nearly one billion people hungry, the world has a food problem—or thinks it does. Farmers, manufacturers, supermarkets and consumers in North America and Europe discard up to half of their food—enough to feed all the world’s hungry at least three times over.
Read more: Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal by Tristram Stuart

American Wasteland by Jonathan Bloom

American Wasteland is a journey through our food chain that raises questions about how our approach to eating has changed so much and what it means. The book introduces myriad characters and tells the story of American food waste through their lives.
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Smallholders, Householders by Robert McC. Netting

Netting argues that smallholder farming, wherever it takes place, is a viable alternative to today’s dominant idea of industrial agriculture, with its dependence on fossil fuels, chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides.
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Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss

From a Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter at The New York Times comes the explosive story of the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the emerging obesity epidemic. Michael Moss reveals how companies use salt, sugar, and fat to addict us and, more important, how we can fight back.
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Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America by Wenonah Hauter

Foodopoly is a text book for anyone who wants to take a crash course in today’s food system: how we got where we are, who are the biggest players, and how today’s food system is jeopardizing the health of consumers – from junk food to poor food safety – and the health of food workers.
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The Organic Seed Grower: A Farmer's Guide to Vegetable Seed Production, By John Navazio

Written by well-known plant breeder and organic seed expert John Navazio, The Organic Seed Grower is the most up-to-date and useful guide to best practices in this exciting and important field. (Ed. Note: And – best of all – John is an all ’round really nice guy!)
Read more: The Organic Seed Grower: A Farmer’s Guide to Vegetable Seed Production, By John Navazio

Biodiversity in Agriculture by Paul Gepts

Bringing together research from a range of fields including anthropology, archaeology, ecology, economics, entomology, ethnobiology, genetics and geography, Biodiversity in Agriculture addresses key questions relating to agriculture.
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Food Lovers’ Guide to Montana, by Seabring Davis

Let’s be honest. No one has ever called Montana a gourmet food destination. It’s far from the trendy world of haute cuisine, black-tie affairs, and fancy culinary techniques. Part of that is because Montana is not easy to get to: it’s far north – up near Canada. And there aren’t a lot of people here – less than a million. And this is a very big state for so few people – which makes it hard to keep a restaurant open.
Read more: Food Lovers’ Guide to Montana, by Seabring Davis

Chelsea Green