An Arhuaco Solution to Man’s Disequilibrium

Osvaldo and I were talking about the ole bees, bouncing around in the back of a truck that was heading down a path, which would have been a nice stroll on foot. I told him about beekeepers in Ethiopia who still used traditional—euphemism for ancient—honey methods, meaning they climb trees and hang tubular, woven baskets,
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The Cloud with a Silver Lining

In October 2016, two Tolima coffee lots ended up in the top five at a country-wide coffee cupping festival, including first place, surprising judges and the public. The victory and recognition comes at critical point for coffee producers in the southern part of the department. Though geo-climatic conditions favor the production of specialty brews with unique flavors, coffee producers face obstacles in processing, accessing financial mechanisms, and finding new markets.
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The Weight of Water

In Columbia’s strategically located region Montes de Maria, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc) roamed the countryside and destroyed entire irrigation systems, stole kilometers of pipelines, and stole or destroyed the pumps that fed the system from large water basins. Fear and destruction dissuaded many farmers from returning to their lands.
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The Apple of Lebanon’s Eye

Liban Village was founded in 1992 as a farmer cooperative and grew to a small company that employs more than 50 people each year. Today, Liban Village works across the apple value chain, from production to sorting, packing and storage, as well as providing extension service training for smallholder apple farmers. Liban Village works with over 300 apple growers that employ thousands of laborers on Lebanon’s apple orchards.
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Ancient Grains, Modern Methods in Lebanon

USAID and partners are increasing the quality and competitiveness of Lebanese freekeh for Middle Eastern foodies.
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Expanding Organic in Lebanon

For several years, Fady Daw has studied how foreign products beat out local products on Lebanon’s high-end, organic foods market. He suspected that much of it had to do with packaging. So he adopted a new strategy and ordered some bottles from Italy.
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Africa's Top Chickpea Producer Brings First Industrial Processing Machine Online in 2015

Ethiopian food processor and exporter Agro Prom has made the first step in changing the course of Ethiopian chickpea history and established the country’s first industrial chickpea processing and cleaning machine.
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Ebola Challenges the Success Achieved in Liberia’s Rice Sector

The Ebola outbreak – which has led to rising food prices and potential food shortages – reinforces the need for self-sufficiency and food security in times of crisis. Liberia has just begun to stabilize a network of rice growers and processors; rice grown in Liberia could go long way to support the Liberian population during this crisis.
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One Man's Revolution to Change Farming in Liberia - Organic, Restorative, Profitable

William Tolbert, a Liberian citizen educated in the US, was inspired by the organic movement here and moved back to his home country in 2010 to implement organic farming techniques. He exemplifies the “Triple Bottom Line” – Environment, Economy, and Ethics – it his farming practice. Now Tolbert is building a program to provide training, support, and microloans, and connections to quality buyers for subsistence farmers so they can grow more and better produce and generate higher incomes and profits.
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Small Amounts of Financing Earn Big Rewards for Vegetable Farmers

By the time they were planting, the good seeds were gone. The problem is that the other farmers didn’t have money to buy the good seeds when they were available. Sometimes there’s no money. A small loan can make all the difference.
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