Cascading Effects: A Seattle Urban Farmer and the 2011 Season

Christine Hahs

Christina Hahs is a sprite with a direct stare. Even at the age of 27 she is not one of the youngest farmers in the City of Seattle. In the egalitarian context of urban agriculture it would be wrong to describe her with any other superlative or enumerator but she is, on her own, guiding a group known as the Harvest Collective. It has not been an easy year, however.
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Is it boring? It's not Provence.

Pole Fishing at Lincoln Park

Local food in Seattle. “The question—’Is it boring?’—is not one that people would ask about local eating in Provence or Thailand or Cajun Country, Louisiana.” (Plenty, Alisa Smith and J.B. MacKinnon, pg. 89.)
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Shoulder to Shoulder We Await Our Food

(Photo: Local Roots Farm)

There is a hydrological term for the end and next beginning of the flooding season wrapped around Summer. It’s called the “Shoulder Season.” The end of the shoulder season is the last flood in the Spring and the beginning, the first in the Fall. We are still touching shoulders with this past year’s season in Western Washington after what many feel is one of the worst flooding seasons we’ve ever had. Yet, the resilience of the farmers should amaze us all.
Read more: Shoulder to Shoulder We Await Our Food