Campanula: Edible Bellflowers

Campanula persicifolia

Gardeners have long cherished many species as ornamentals, for their lovely bell-shaped flowers. Nearly all species bear blue or white flowers; extremely few have yellow flowers. A few species have been grown as vegetables, and many others are eaten from the wild.
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Devil's Club: Aptly Named, But Tasty

Devil’s Club is a deciduous shrub related to the healing herb ginseng and common ivy. It is an unmistakable denizen of Seattle’s wet ravines and unsuspecting hikers regularly fall victim to its barbed spines. The surprise is that its roots and young are rather tasty.
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Spicy in Seattle: Japanese Ginger

Native certainly in parts of SE China, and cultivated much if not native in Japan and S Korea, Japanese Ginger is a woodland perennial that turns yellow and dies down in fall, rests during the cold winter, then shoots up again next spring, growing about 3 to 4 feet in height. Most Zingiber species are cold-sensitive; this one is hardy.
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Chaya - Mayan Tree-Spinach, Cabbage Star

The Chaya plant offers extraordinary attributes as a food crop: potential year-round yields; highly nutritious; tasty; productive; minimal pest or disease susceptibility; tolerant of diverse growing conditions; easily propagated; perennial; handsome foliage; fragrant flowers that attract butterflies, moths and bees; useful forage for domestic animals. On the minus side… it is freeze-tender; its leaves should be cooked rather than ingested raw; it has but few cultivars, and their relative merit and behavior are practically undocumented. Overall, more people should know about, and grow, Chaya — hence this article.
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Peanut-Butter Fruit or Peanut-Butter Plant

Two species share common names (Peanut-butter Fruit or Peanut-butter Plant) and confusingly similar scientific names: Bunchosia argentea and Bunchosia Armeniaca. Therefore, I sought to learn what’s the difference? Which is more commonly cultivated? This article shares my findings. The reason I care is because the plants bear pretty yellow blossoms and red edible fruit.
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Black Mulberry Tree (Morus nigra)

My favorite berry is black mulberry, because it is so delicious, and such a rare treat to eat in Seattle. I have requested that a black mulberry tree be planted on my grave.
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Edible Succulents - Indoor Garden in a Bicycle Wheel Planter

Arthur Lee Jacobson took a damaged rear bicycle wheel, cleaned it of grime, and rigged it into a planter for edible succulents. It recalls, in its shallow soil depth, and succulent plants, a miniature version of a rooftop garden. Here’s how he did it.
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Growing Sweet Potatoes in Seattle - Is It Possible?

During 2010, I tried to grow sweet potatoes in Seattle. Briefly summarized: I learned that cultivars vary immensely and that growing sweet potato plants for their edible leaves is well worthwhile; but for their swollen roots alone, I found them not worth space in a garden here.
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Growing Wild Strawberries: Fragaria vesca

Wild strawberries are an easy plant to grow – tuck them in, water them a little, and soon they will give you the daintiest, sweetest strawberries you’ve ever tasted. Plant them near your door and grab a handful for your breakfast cereal! Arthur Lee Jacobson, Puget Sound’s edible plant expert, provides us with today’s comments on growing the Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca).
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